Grocery Journal

Dear Fellow Journalers,

Over the past several months we’ve been exploring different types of journals and when I came across this one, I realized that the concept went way beyond a “grocery list”. Several years ago, while channel surfing, my husband and I watched a fascinating program about city planning. Now, I know what you’re thinking – what has city planning got to do with food shopping? Well, the take-away from the program was to introduce the viewer to the why’s and how’s of how the modern city came to be. Why were main streets so important? In colonial times, the main street comprised the town green, important government buildings, churches etc. Main Street came to be known as the elite area to build stores.

After Main Street came the Avenues and the bakery shop, butcher shop, florist, hardware store sprang up along those areas. In the early days of “grocery shopping,” the buyer, usually the wife/mother shopped in several stores once a week. The concept of one store selling all of the above had not been conceived yet.

I can remember as a young child going to the butcher shop and gazing through a glass case at the different types of meat and watching him grind up our hamburger meat. It was a necessary trip for my mom but also a social one as several neighborhood women were often there as well. Milk was delivered in glass bottles from the milk man and fresh produce was sold down the street from our home.

Many shoppers today “zip” into their favorite store for the quick and easy meal or the “oh my gosh, we’re getting a snow storm item” without a thought to:

Why the items are placed where they are?

Why are there displays?

How come “xyz” store now sells organic?

Why do stores sell “not sold in stores” items?

Why am I always tempted to buy chocolate chip cookies at B.J’s?

There’s a strategy to all this and in a way it’s akin to city planning. Next week we’ll delve into the history of supermarkets.

Happy shopping,

~Sallie

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The Spoken Word

“Everything becomes a little different as soon as it is spoken out loud.”

Herman Hesse

Prompts on Film Journals

Dear Fellow Journalers,

Remember when I used to use prompts? Here are a few to get you started:

  1. What is your favorite movie? Persuade your friend in writing that they must see _____.
  2. Do you have a favorite action movie? Does your hero have a special weapon?
  3. Did you like the book or the movie version? Recently there have been many remakes of books – which ones were closest to the book?
  4. Write an analysis of the main character. Describe their appearance, qualities, desires and something that surprised you about their background.
  5. What movie made its greatest impact on you? Explain with 3 scenes.

Happy Journaling,

~Sallie

Word Ghosts and life

 

” Your life isn’t some pre-recorded movie where, no matter how many times you watch it, the ending remains the same. Your life is a book in progress, and you are the author. So, if you don’t care for the main character or the gloomy scenery or how the twisted plot is unfolding, then do something to change it. Your write your own story.”

Rachel E. Goodrich (Making Wishes)

How to write a Film Journal

Dear Fellow Journalers,

In order to analyse a film, you need to watch the film carefully and write in your journal soon after. If you are going to just RATE  (like Good Reads or Amazon) you don’t need to read further. But if you really want to analyze the films you watch you need to:

  1. Keep notes on specific scenes and explain why they are important to the outline or character development.
  2. Note significant moments that made you want to stop the movie, think, and re-wind.
  3. Make a plot summary so you can remember the film!
  4. Write down your reactions to the movie plot and the ending.

You might be surprised to know that movie directors and writers write film jounals too. Here are some famous diary entries. This one is from Stanley Kubrick, director of Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odessey and Shining.

The entry dates back to the early-60’s when Kubrick was trying to come up with a name for the movie he was in the process of making. This is fascinating for a number of reasons – the opportunity to look at a genius’ brainstorming process, the chance to imagine the classic film existing with any of these alternate titles – but it’s probably most interesting because this page ultimately led to what is arguably one of the greatest names for a movie of all time: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. (In turn, the movie was based on a book with a comparatively lackluster name: Red Alert.)

Here’s a list of some of the titles Kubrick came up with:

Doctor Doomsday
Don’t Knock the Bomb
Dr. Doomsday and his Nuclear Wiseman
Dr. Doomsday Meets Ingrid Strangelove
Dr. Doomsday or: How to Start World War III Without Even Trying
Dr. Strangelove’s Bomb
Dr. Strangelove’s Secret Uses of Uranus
My Bomb, Your Bomb
Save The Bomb
Strangelove: Nuclear Wiseman
The Bomb and Dr. Strangelove or: How to be Afraid 24hrs a Day
The Bomb of Bombs
The Doomsday Machine
The Passion of Dr. Strangelove
Wonderful Bomb
It’s curious to note in the actual written entry (see below) how the ultimate title doesn’t appear and also how some ideas are circled, some are not, some words are underlined, some are written in cursive, some are not, etc.

 

Many films begin with the reading of a book. No shock there, right? This doesn’t mean the re-making of a book necessarily. For instance, Julian Fellows of Downtown Abbey fame said that at the time he was commissioned to write the story of Downtown Abbey he was reading a book entitled ” To marry an English Lord” about an American heiress who had gone to marrying into an English family during the Victorian era. He asked himself “What was it like after that?” He decided to develop the characters, a community, and the interactions between its members that would tell their story: the rivalry, jealousy, love, hatred, births, marriages, deaths.

And finally, there’s Frank Capra who is famous for “It’s A Wonderful Life” which originally came from a story entitled “The Greatest Gift” by Marc Connelly. In an interview for the New York Times in December 1947, he talked about his philosophy about script writing:

“No script can be taken as gospel. It must be adapted to actors, to the set. Scripts may be written, but pictures aren’t written… any good scene can be expanded almost indefinitely.” Capra would work over the scrip before he shot it – tightening, writing new dialog, changing characterizations, eliminating scenes, adding needed actions and writing all these notes on scraps of paper.

One example of a script change is the Honeymoon scene. As originally written, it was supposed to end with the predictable Honeymoon kiss. But Capra wrote the scene as follows:

“Bert and Ernie hanging posters. Mary tells them to hurry. When George arrives they hide and sing a song outside the window in the rain. Ernie kisses Bert on the head.”

Happy film watching,

~Sallie

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