How to find a Read-A-Like

Dear Fellow Journalers,

If you read series books, I have mentioned my favorites in the past (Murder She Wrote, Cosy Mystery series from Joanne Fluke and Miranda James) when you’re either waiting for the author’s next book or just wanting to find a read-a-like, where do you find it?  This article from the Cheshire Library Blog may help you.

~Sallie

New post on The Cheshire Library Blog

How to Find a Read-alike by Mary

If you are like me, when I find a series I love I burn through it in record time and then am left mourning that I have finished the series. Finding a new series can be difficult, so invariably I turn to NoveList for help.

NoveList is an online database that offers recommended reading lists. You can sort by age and genre and even by topics such as “fast-paced and amusing” or “moving and haunting” and even “snarky and compelling”. However my favorite part of NoveList is the Read-alike links.

If you type in a book title or author, NoveList will produce a list of results that include three very handy links: Title Read-alikes, Author Read-Alikes and Series Read-alikes.

What is a Read-alike?

A read-alike is a book, author, or series that shares some of the basic characteristics of another book, author, or series. It means that if you enjoy, say, author Marcia Muller, you may also like books by Laurie R. King, Kate Wilhelm, or Iain Pears,

For example, type in Lord Peter Wimsey (one of my favorite British mystery sleuths), click on Series Read-alikes, and you will get a list of recommendations that include the Phryne Fisher mysteries by Kerry Greenwood (stories that have also been turned into a wonderful BBC drama: Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries) and the Adam Dalgliesh mysteries by P.D. James, among many others.

Bingo! Two more series just waiting to be devoured.

Try NoveList. It works!

July Prompts

 

  • If you had to become someone else for 24 hours, who would you choose and why? What would you do?
  • List as many things that you can see right now that you are grateful for?
  • Think about 5 different ways you could treat yourself by spending less than $5. Do one of them this week.
  • What does “courage” mean to you?

Notebook

“A notebook can be a clearing in the forest of your life:a place where you can play, with outrage and wonder, details and gossips, language and dreams, plots and subplots, perceptions and small epiphanies.”

Creative Writing Journal

Dear Fellow Journalers,

As most readers to this blog can attest, I was a tomboy growing up. I climbed trees, rode horses, played baseball, watched tv westerners (Bonanza, being my favorite show), and had a newspaper route each summer. I also read and dabbled in crafts.While most of my girlfriends were learning the latest dance moves, I was learning Irish Step Dancing.

Recently, while cleaning out a drawer I found my creative writing journal from college.There were sections for descriptive writings, poetry, Story starters, and quotes from books.

About a year and a half ago, I discovered a tv show called Laramie. It had originally aired 1959-1963 but I had never seen it. Well , being that I was retired, I soon started watching it every day. I was drawn to the characters and plots. While surfing the internet for more information on the show, I found a site called fan fiction, which I never knew existed. The writers, people just like us, write “missing scenes” or entirely new stories about tv shows, books, movies, cartoons, plays or movies.

Back in January of 2020, an idea began to take hold and I bought a 5 subject notebook to write out my “Story”. I started by dividing my sections into character development, New characters, main and sub plots, snippets of conversation and finally research. I wrote out the first draft and then let it alone for awhile as I contemplated whether or not to submit it.I am not a professional writer; I write a blog. Doubts followed me around for a few weeks.  Then I ‘re-wrote the first chapter and got stuck.

  1.  I needed to write an outline and stick to it. The last time I wrote a timeline was in college!
  2. How would I advance the story?
  3. What was the best way to describe a scene?
  4. How much emotion to write?
  5. If I submitted it, how would I react to negative comments?

And on and on…

In the following weeks I will share my progress and maybe you can start your own creative writing journal too.

 

~Sallie

Dreams

Image

Words

Dear Fellow Journalers,

Are you a collector of words? Do you read books and highlight phrases? If so, you are not alone. Some of the best prompts have come from those phrases.

I started collecting phrases back in high school. The one notebook I started with became several more until they filled up an entire shelf! The only problem with my collection is that some of my entries .did not mention the book title.

When I started again .earlier this year I made sure to note the origin of the phrase. I want to share some of these ” gems” with you today. Some of them are mine and these will be marked with a *.

“Journal writing takes you across the bridge toward acceptance of your creative self, your spiritual self; accepting what is, with love, joy and freedom.” The Four Methods of Journal Writing  by Melissa Burch

“Having a sense of self-worth is an act of faith” The Mistletoe Inn by Richard Post Evans

“The ache inside a person never ceases when there is no closure.Estrangement brings on a profound sense of loss.The ache is deep and never goes away.” *

“The problem with the past is that too often yesterday’ s lessons were meant for yesterday’s problems.” Richard Paul Evans

“Trace my face with your eyes,, her mother had told her a few nights before she died. Trace my face, then close your eyes and imagine me there. Can you see me? That’s where I’ll always be. Right there, locked away tight.”  Along the broken road by Heather Burch

“Memories, he’d learned, were the cornerstones of life. Memories are pictures. They’re stored in the part of your mind where happiness lives.”  Something like family by Heaher Burch

“I’m in mourning for the death of my hope and for the future. Joanne Fluke

“Life gives you two choices. Regret the past or change the present.”” When we were young by Karen Kingsbury

“It literally hurt my chest to breathe in this snow-laced air that made it feel as if I’d swallowed mouthful of icicles.” Murder She Wrote: The Murder of Twelve” Jessica Fletcher

“He was a hollow man, pieces of his heart were strewn about the ranch house like Mike’s  wooden soldiers forgotten  on his bedroom floor.” *

“My feelings break and crash over me like a dust storm on the prairie.” *

“The horse I thought was sitting on my chest has trotted off_ and if I don’t take a deep breath, I can talk to people”.*

Previous Older Entries

Calendar

July 2020
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Heartfelt Creations

Uniquely Yours Cards~ Celebrating all occasions with a handcrafted touch ~

A Part of Me to Share

a writer's blog

Life Vest Inside

Listening to my heart, one journal step at a time.

kelleysdiy

Where Creativity and Imagination Creates Wonderful Ideas for Your Home!

Awaken Everyday

The Copper Beech Institute Blog

Novelty Revisions

Putting ideas into words.

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Audrey Pettit Designs

Listening to my heart, one journal step at a time.

%d bloggers like this: