Word Ghosts take risks

“Our future lies chiefly in our own hands.”

Paul Robeson

“I don’t know where I’m going but I’m on the way.”

Carl Sandburg

” Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

Amelia Earhart

” Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.”

James Bryant Conant

(American Chemist)

Prompts and Resources

Dear Fellow Journalers,


     When you write in a Mindfulness Journal you are already moving toward the practice of mindfulness. You observe your feelings in real-time, paying attention about your thoughts and not challenging them.

     As you become adept at practicing awareness and living in the moment, you’ll naturally want to write out your thoughts. Some people can start with a prompt to inspire them. The main thing is to begin with the same intention  that is a the crux of all mindfulness practice stay present and fully aware.

Some tips:

     a) Decide how much time you want to spend writing your entries.

     b) Write, don’t edit. “Stream of consciousness” writing allows you to access the part of you that lets you experience your life moment to moment.

     c) If you do re-read your journal posts, do so without criticism. If you write long enough, you’ll begin to see patterns in your life. You’ll see what emotions or distractions consume you while you meditate. You’ll be able to see how mindfulness has changed your relationship with stress, difficult people, problem solving and the balance of your life.

     d) When you write note the date, name of meditation practice you used that day and how long you meditated. Then write your comments on your experiences, what you used to re-focus and what you felt.

Questions to ask yourself:

     1. What did I notice and how am I feeling about my meditation?

     2. What am I feeling in this moment?

     3. What is bothering me?

     4. What are my strengths?

     5. I want to thank …..

     6. People always…..

     7. I would like to volunteer my time today doing….

     8. I remember….

     9. I’m really afraid of ….

    10. I don’t want to write today because…


     There are many books, web sites and videos for Mindfulness. Here are a few resources I would like to share:


www. headspace.com      turns your tablet/phone info into a guided meditation

www. mediationstudio.com  step by step course available to apple app store

http://www.balanced.com   app to track your life’s goals available to apple app store



check out my blog post on 4/16/16




Other sites




“Wherever you go, there you are. Mindfulness meditation in Everyday Life”

                                                                                    Jon Kabat-Zinn

“Journaling with Jesus”   Laurie Snyman

“Mindfulness made simple” Calistoga Press

“Mindfulness, Meditation and Mind Fitness” Joel and Michelle Levey

“Mindfulness for Beginners: Reclaiming the Present Moment and your life” by Jon Kabat-Zinn

“Peace is every step. The Path of Mindfulness in everyday life” by Thichi Nhat Hanh

     May Peace and Joy fill your life.

‘Til next time,


Word Ghosts seek inspiration

“Curiosity inspires learning. Learning inspires knowledge. Knowledge inspires wisdom.”    unknown

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules and they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, and disagree with them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things.”  from the book “365 Journal Writing ideas.:


Mindfulness and Mediation

Dear Fellow Journalers,

I first heard about this practice when I taught a fifth grade religion class at my church. I had a rather rambunctious group that year and it took a lot of energy and wasted time to settle them down each morning. Several weeks into that school year, I was invited to a teachers’ conference and was introduced to one of the books that would change my life. It was written primarily for teachers of Religious Middle Schoolers and featured scripture stories and meditations.

I have to admit, I was skeptical at first. I read through the book and adapted one of the stories and meditations for my next class. The reaction was amazing. Several students didn’t want to stop and “come back to earth.” Even the most mischievous of the group was calmer. I decided to try the experiment once a month, but after the second month, the students asked if we could meditate every week! In time, I grew confident enough to script my own stories (based on the lesson) and meditations and found myself meditating as well. This practice continued throughout the rest of the school year until I “retired” some 10 years later.

Along the way, I was formally introduced to Mindfulness Meditation at Holy Family Retreat Center in West Hartford CT. The workshop has become the highlight of my yearly retreat. I learned that this practice has no specific goal except awareness and acceptance in your life. There are many types of meditations – some focus on a word or a phrase, some on a particular image or visualization. You look at your thoughts and feelings as though you were looking at a different person, without analyzing those thoughts or feelings.

Some of the mediations are breath, common concerns, body scan, walking, emotions, night, smile, laughing, loving, difficult people, self-criticism, positive feelings, anxiety, stress, insomnia, gratitude, and peace.

The following is a brief synopsis of how to practice mediation. If you have a book or better yet, an audio of meditation, please refer to that resource.

  1. Find an environment where you can be free from distractions for a short period of time. A peaceful view of the ocean or a picture will help you create this space. Some people light candles or create an altar of found objects like shells or stones.

  2. Choose a chair where you can sit up straight with your feet touching the floor. You can close your eyes completely or just gaze downward.

  3. Pick a time for practice every day that will be non-evasive on your schedule. You can even make an appointment with yourself, if you wish. The duration is up to you. Some people start with 10 minutes a day and build from there.

  4. Pick an anchor. Those pesky thoughts may intrude and distracted thought is not constructive to meditation so it helps to re-focus from time to time. The anchor can be one of the objects in your room, part of your body (like a hand), or word or phrase. My practice has always included the breath as an anchor. There are many books, audio and even apps that can help you in your practice. Mindfulness meditation requires practice not perfection.

  5. Follow your breath. Begin by taking 3-4 breaths. Be aware that you are breathing. Feel your breath traveling from your mouth or nose to your lungs, chest and abdomen. If your mind wanders go back to the breath. After your timer goes off, reconnect to the world around you and process the meditation by writing in your journal.

‘Til next time,



Word Ghosts are accomplished

“Not in the clamor of the crowded street, not in the shouts and plaudits of the throng, but in ourselves are triumph and defeat.”

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Today’s accomplishments were yesterday’s impossibilities.”

Robert H. Schuller

“There are times when words seem empty and only actions seem great.”

Woodrow Wilson

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

Frederick Douglass

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: